The wonderful fantasy world of Brian Froud

10153
Advertisement
Brian Froud's son, Toby, with David Bowie in Labyrinth

If you love fantasy, fairies, goblins and art, then you should probably know who Brian Froud is. Brian Froud is an amazingly talented fantasy illustrator (and the father of Toby – the little baby in Jim Henson’s Labyrinth).

“I paint the spirit and soul of what I see.” ~ Brian Froud

Artist: Brian Froud

WHO IS BRIAN FROUD?

Brian and his wife Wendy

Brian Froud (born 1947) is an English fantasy illustrator and conceptual designer. He is married to Wendy Froud. Wendy is also a fantasy artist, and an internationally acclaimed doll maker. His son, Toby (born 1984), portrayed the baby Toby, in the film Labyrinth, and later became a puppeteer and creature fabricator, working alongside his parents on The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance.

Advertisement

The landscapes in his paintings are frequently inspired by Dartmoor, an upland area in southern Devon, England.

Froud was the conceptual designer and costume designer for the films The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth (both in conjunction with Jim Henson’s Creature Shop).

Here is some of his most famous illustration works:


Faeries (1978) — With Alan Lee
The World of the Dark Crystal (1982)
The Goblins of Labyrinth (1986) (reissued in abridged form as The Goblin Companion: A Field Guide to Goblins (1986)
The Dreaming Place (1990)
Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Book (1994)
Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Journal (1998)
Good Faeries/Bad Faeries (1998)
The Runes of Elfland (2003)
How to See Faeries (2011) — With John Matthews
Trolls (2012) — With Wendy Froud



Brian Froud’s Faerielands series

The Faerieland series is a collaborative series of books where the authors chose from a set of illustrations by Brian Froud and wrote their novels around those illustrations.

Something Rich and Strange (1994) by Patricia A. McKillip
The Wild Wood (1994) by Charles de Lint
The Wood Wife (1996) by Terri Windling
Hannah’s Garden (2002) by Midori Snyder


Brian Froud also did a lot of great conceptual work for well-known movies:

NerdiPop’s fun fact cards for Brian Froud

Advertisement
Previous article11 Facts that you probably didn’t know about Houdini
Next articleEdna Mode (The Incredibles) vs Edith Head